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Welcome to the Braco and Greenloaning Community Council Website

Braco and Greenloaning are two small, adjacent villages just off the A9 on the A822 road to Crieff.  Approximately 6 miles from Dunblane and 8 miles from Crieff.

History

The Romans built a number of forts nearly 2000 years ago, including Ardoch at Braco, connected by a line of watchtowers and fortlets across the southern edge of Perthshire. This appears to be the first formal northern frontier of the Roman Empire and was constructed 40 years before Hadrian's Wall. The Romans withdrew after a short time. In the 140's they returned to Perthshire to rebuild at least some of their earlier fortifications, reoccupied Ardoch and stayed this time for around 20 years.

Ardoch was in fact one of the largest Roman stations in Britain but now grass covered rampants and ditches are all that remains. The site is however both remarkable and fascinating.
Near Braco is Tullibardine Chapel. This Collegiate Church was founded by Sir David Murray in 1445 and remains unaltered

Amenities

Braco Amenities

  • A village shop on Front Street
  • A filling station on Front Street
  • An auto repair garage on Mid Lane
  • Ardoch Church, part of the Church of Scotland, Feddal Road
  • Braco Primary School and Nursery on Feddal Road
  • Braco Village Hall on Feddal Road
  • Playpark on Feddal Road
  • Lawn Bowling Club on Feddal Road
  • A Perth and Kinross Council Recycling Point on Feddal Road
  • The Lodge Park, home to the annual Braco Show, an agricultural event

Greenloaning Amenities

  • Greenloaning Primary School at the junction of Millhill Road and the A9
  • Playpark on Millhill Drive

Interesting Fact

The founder of the English Football League William McGregor, was born in Braco in 1846.

 

Community Councils - Why are we here?

Role of Community Councils 
Community Councils were set up
“to ascertain, co-ordinate and express to the local authorities for its area and to public authorities the views of the community which it represents in relation to matters for which those authorities are responsible” and “to take such action in the interests of that community as appears to it to be expedient and practicable”. 
This gives a great deal of scope for community councils to get involved in a variety of local issues: to develop local projects and activities (on their own or with others), and to represent community opinion to local authorities and public bodies.
Background legislation
Community Councils were set up as part of the Local Government reorganisation in 1973. Their general purpose is defined in the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 and in the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994.
Constitutional issues
The model constitution and model code of conduct for Community Councils can be found on the community councils’ page on the Perth and Kinross Council website.




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